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The lesson from yesterday’s election is to ignore pontificating from highly paid pundits. Put your faith in the numbers

Van Reenen, John
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 07/11/2012 Português
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John Van Reenen finds great cause for optimism in President Obama having won a second term. He argues that this election was also a vindication for quantitative social science, as the eventual results confirmed what mathematical models had predicted contrary to the instincts of pundits.

Book review: The behavioral foundations of public policy

Miller, Jennifer
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 04/06/2013 Português
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"The Behavioral Foundations of Public Policy." Edited by Eldar Shafir. Princeton University Press. November 2012. --- This collection examines the policy relevance of behavioural science to our social and political lives, to issues ranging from health, environment, and nutrition, to dispute resolution, implicit racism, and false convictions. The book aims to illuminate the relationship between behavioural findings and economic analyses, and calls attention to what policymakers might learn from this vast body of groundbreaking work. Those in government, non-profits, and the private sector interested in empirically supported ways to motivate people to act in their own best interest will find a rich source of examples and exposure to underlying theory in The Behavioral Foundations of Public Policy, writes Jennifer Miller.

The Government must be held to its promise to “enshrine in law for the future the necessity of consulting Parliament on military action”

Allen, Graham
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 06/12/2011 Português
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We need to be clear about Parliament’s role in decisions to take us to war – and we aren’t there yet, says Graham Allen MP, Chair of the Political and Constitutional Reform Committee in the House of Commons.

Performing resistance, very real problems and the 99% (guest blog)

Cammaerts, Bart
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 20/10/2011 Português
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This is a response to my blog about media and protests by my colleague Dr Bart Cammaerts, who specialises in research around alternative media, political communications and protest.

Policymakers follow pertinent academic research, but see much of it as irrelevant to their work

Avey, Paul; Desch, Michael
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 13/03/2014 Português
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Last year, U.S. Congressman Eric Cantor called for an end to federal funding for political and social science, claiming that the funds could be better spent on medical research. The renewal of this contentious debate begs the important question, what do policymakers ideally want from scholars and their work? To answer this, Paul Avey and Michael Desch surveyed nearly 1000 former national security policymakers and found that while they follow international relations research, the prevalence of jargon as well as the focus on quantitative studies and techniques alienates many of these important readers.

Burning assets

Ali, Taskeen
Fonte: LSE Research Festival 2014, The London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: LSE Research Festival 2014, The London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Image; NonPeerReviewed Formato: image/jpeg
Publicado em 08/05/2014 Português
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Charcoal traders, Goma. In an environment where the rebel groups have established a shadow state and economy in a political economy framed by war, charcoal as a necessity is traded every day in Goma, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The majority of charcoal in the markets here comes from Virunga National Park, a UN world heritage site. The charcoal allows the people here to survive; it then bites back with violence that is financed by the very same things. In contrast to existing scholarship on internationally traded high value commodities and conflict, for the first time, my initial research has found that charcoal as a locally traded low value good is funding and sustaining the conflict in North Eastern DRC. Rebel groups in collaboration with the Congolese army and local farmers generate ‘black money’ from this trade as a means for survival.

Charred by charcoal

Ali, Taskeen
Fonte: LSE Research Festival 2014, The London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: LSE Research Festival 2014, The London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Image; NonPeerReviewed Formato: image/jpeg
Publicado em 08/05/2014 Português
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A boy borne down with charcoal on his chukudu (home-made cycle), Goma. In an environment where the rebel groups have established a shadow state and economy in a political economy framed by war, charcoal as a necessity is traded every day in Goma, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. It is this charcoal trading that allows the boy to survive; it then bites back with violence that is financed by the very same things. In contrast to existing scholarship on internationally traded high value commodities and conflict, for the first time, my initial research has found that charcoal as a locally traded low value good is funding and sustaining the conflict in North Eastern DRC. Rebel groups in collaboration with the Congolese army and local farmers generate ‘black money’ from this trade as a means for survival.

Black money

Ali, Taskeen
Fonte: LSE Research Festival 2014, The London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: LSE Research Festival 2014, The London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Image; NonPeerReviewed Formato: image/jpeg
Publicado em 08/05/2014 Português
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554.87336%
A charcoal market, Goma. In an environment where the rebel groups have established a shadow state and economy in a political economy framed by war, charcoal as a necessity is traded every day in Goma, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Traders are aware of illegal charcoal from Virunga National Park, a UN world heritage site. It is this charcoal trading that allows them to barely survive; it then bites back with violence that is financed by the very same things. In contrast to existing scholarship on internationally traded high value commodities and conflict, for the first time, my initial research has found that charcoal as a locally traded low value good is funding and sustaining the conflict in North Eastern DRC. Rebel groups in collaboration with the Congolese army and local farmers generate ‘black money’ from this trade as a means for survival.

Weaknesses in Japan’s post war politics

Oyama, Reiko; Takeda, Tomoki
Fonte: The London School of Economics and Political Science, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines Publicador: The London School of Economics and Political Science, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /06/2010 Português
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Discusses Japan’s political immobilism caused by lack of strong ministerial leadership and failure of reform initiatives. Attributes it to the power of factions within political parties which reforms have failed to break and the dominance of the bureaucracy. Paper surveys the two decades since 1993 when the LDP monopoly first broke down and specially the Koizumi years (2001-6). It traces the difficulties of institutional change back to the constitution formulated during Allied occupation of Japan (1945-52) and discusses how far Japan follows, and can aspire to, a two-party system on a Westminster model. Discusses the system of government inaugurated in 1955 and the way in which it has been changed over the years, quoting earlier authors. This has tended to be a ‘state-party cartel’ whereby Japan’s rapid economic growth was fostered by the alliance between the LDP, the bureaucracy and big business. After failure of Socialist party, parties had to resort to coalition politics in order to achieve united opposition.

There is little common ground between the two opposing moral narratives on the implementation of Obamacare

Saltman, Richard B.
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 18/10/2013 Português
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Two weeks ago on 1 October, the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) began implementation, despite the government’s shutdown due to disagreements between the Republican and Democratic parties over its funding. Richard B. Saltman looks at the two opposing moral narratives over the ACA: one which focusses on the program’s health benefits, and a second which argues that the ACA represents a fundamental political and bureaucratic threat to the continued decentralized governance and economic future of America. Past experience with similar clashes between completely different moral narratives indicates that the US may well be in for a long-term war of political attrition over the ACA.

U.S. government shutdown ends – reaction from USApp experts, updated

Huder, Joshua
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 22/10/2013 Português
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On Wednesday night Congress came to an agreement to end the US-government’s 16 day shutdown, and to raise the debt ceiling until at least early February. We asked our expert contributors for their immediate reactions to the agreement. •The political realities that brought about the government shutdown and the debt crisis have not changed - Joshua Huder – Georgetown University •The consensus-building role of women was crucial to ending the government shutdown. - Craig Volden, University of Virginia, Alan E. Wiseman, Vanderbilt University and Dana E. Wittmer, Colorado College. •The bipartisan compromise budget and debt ceiling deal is a temporary fix - Rosalyn Cooperman – University of Mary Washington. •No trust has been built between the important players – Michele Swers -Georgetown University. •The role of the “Wall Street Wing” of the Republican Party has become even more important now. – Roy Meyers – University of Maryland. The political realities that brought about the government shutdown and the debt crisis have not changed Joshua Huder is a a Senior Fellow at the Government Affairs Institute at Georgetown University.

Big wins for Christie, de Blasio, Obama’s broken promise, and should Puerto Rico become a state? – US blog round up for 2 – 8 November

Gilson, Christopher
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 08/11/2013 Português
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Chris Gilson looks at the best in political blogging from the Beltway and across the States. Elections this week Tuesday sees elections across much of the U.S., at state and local level, with the most attention focused on the New Jersey and Virginia gubernatorial elections, as well as the New York Mayoral election. In the lead up to the vote in New York, Democrat Bill de Blasio enjoyed a commanding poll lead, looking certain to win. On Saturday, Via Meadia looked at why we should fear de Blasio – not because he is likely to try and raise taxes on the rich, but because he is likely to do little to address the potential decline of the middle classes in the city once the Federal Reserve Bank’s policy of quantitative easing begins to come to an end. American Thinker on the other hand, is concerned that de Blasio is looking the other way on New York’s crime problems. After de Blasio is elected, The Atlantic looks at his ‘biracial cool’, while the New Yorker says that his populist campaign message, which was so effective, was a reaction to a changed political environment.

Voter migration is a significant factor in the geographic sorting of the American electorate

Cho, Wendy K.Tam
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 19/11/2013 Português
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Almost any electoral map of the United States clearly shows an association between political beliefs and geography; states in the South and Midwest tend to vote Republican, while the West Coast and Northeast reliably lean Democratic. Following this, Wendy K. Tam Cho looks for evidence of political self-segregation—that is, individuals moving to areas that contain clusters of other like-minded people—by tracking movement using voter records from 2004, 2006, and 2008. Her results indicate that, while it may not be the only factor, partisan sorting is a significant component of destination decisions. Don’t Take No for an Answer: The 2011 Referendum and the Future of Electoral Reform. Lewis Baston and Ken Ritchie. Biteback Publishing. September 2011.

Increased polarization in politics reduces voter turnout

Rogowski, Jon
Fonte: London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 04/12/2013 Português
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As the government shutdown in October showed, the U.S. is currently in a period of deep political division. Using data collected from in dozens of U.S. Senate races between 1996 and 2006, and 50 U.S. House races in 2006, Jon Rogowski examines the effect of this partisan polarization on electoral behaviors. His results suggest that increasing policy differences between candidates significantly reduces voter turnout, particularly among citizens with lower levels of education and political knowledge.

The reactions to the 1988 Yellowstone wildfires highlight the differences in American and Canadian politics

Orr, Shannon K.; Fifer, Nichole
Fonte: London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 10/01/2014 Português
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In 1988, Yellowstone National Park in the Northwest United States experienced the largest wildfires in its more than 100-year history. Shannon K. Orr and Nichole Fifer take a close look at the reactions of policy-makers in the U.S. and Canada to the fires, writing that while Parks Canada adopted a policy of ‘let-burn’, U.S. authorities have taken a far more interventionist line. They argue that these reactions are the products of the two country’s differing political systems. In Canada decision-making is highly centralized, and largely rests with Parks Canada, while in the U.S., the separation of powers often means that public policies are open to multiple avenues of influence, and power often rests with political appointees and federal politicians.

Knowing the unknowns: financial policymaking in uncertainty

Gandrud, Christopher
Fonte: London School of Economics and Political Science Thesis Publicador: London School of Economics and Political Science Thesis
Tipo: Thesis; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 28/03/2012 Português
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How do policymakers make decisions during financial market uncertainty? I develop a straightforward framework of policymaking in uncertainty. To overcome uncertainty, policymakers gather information using strategies discussed across a variety of political science disciplines. Policymakers need information to be able to make goal-oriented decisions. The information strategies actors choose are conditioned on the uncertainty problems they face. In turn, the information they receive impacts their policy decisions. My three empirical papers investigate what strategies are likely to be chosen in different types of uncertainty and how these choices affect policy decisions. My first paper, co-written with Mícheál O’Keeffe, develops a signaling game that policymakers play when they perceive data uncertainty, i.e. uncertainty about economic fundamentals. The model is supported empirically with analytic narratives of recent crises in Korea and Ireland. My following two papers deal with situations of increasing causal uncertainty, i.e. uncertainty about how actions cause outcomes. In both of these papers I use Multi-state Event History Analysis. I find that when there is high causal uncertainty policymakers tend to use learning strategies that start with international-level policy recommendations. These recommendations are then updated with the experiences of regional peers who have adopted them. Beyond creating and finding evidence for a parsimonious framework of decisionmaking in uncertainty...

Even flow: water privatization and the mobilization of power in the Philippines

Chng, Nai Rui
Fonte: London School of Economics and Political Science Thesis Publicador: London School of Economics and Political Science Thesis
Tipo: Thesis; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em //2013 Português
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This thesis investigates the politics of privatization and contentious collective action in the water sector in the Philippines. It examines the complex interplay of diverse forces in the everyday politics of water in Metropolitan Manila with a particular emphasis on organized urban poor communities and non-governmental organizations. The thesis illustrates how these groups engage with regulatory agencies, multilateral institutions, transnational corporations, informal water venders, and local machine politicians to play key roles in shaping the regulation of water provision in the developing world. Thus, to understand the material realities and lived experiences of the urban poor in cities like Metro Manila, close attention must be paid to patterns of contestation, competition, and collaboration among a diverse array of actors, across local, national, and international levels of analysis. Using Karl Polanyi’s insights on the socio-political consequences of market extension as a point of departure, I show that although water privatization and social resistance can be understood in terms of a ‘double movement’, Polanyi’s framework is insufficient for more detailed analysis. Hence, I develop new analytical tools to examine the nature of water privatization-related mobilization in the Philippines. Examining the micro-politics of the urban poor in their collective action for water at the local level...

Defying moderation? the transformation of radical Irish republicanism, 1969-2010

Whiting, Matthew
Fonte: London School of Economics and Political Science Thesis Publicador: London School of Economics and Political Science Thesis
Tipo: Thesis; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /05/2013 Português
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This thesis examines the causal pathways underpinning the moderation of radical ethno-nationalism using the case of Irish republicanism (Sinn Féin and the IRA) between 1969 and 2010. Through the application of the ‘inclusion-moderation’ framework, I argue that a strong macro-institutional framework is central to the process of moderation. Existing explanations that emphasise the role of interplay, exchange and leadership choices typically neglect the importance of this wider institutional framework in enabling and shaping the decisions made. In the case of Irish republicanism, the processes of electoral participation, bargaining to design stable democratic institutions, and securing credible guarantees to protect their interests from the United States, all combined and reinforced each other to create a scenario whereby republicans moderated. These processes hinged upon stable democratic institutions that were perceived by republicans as embodying relatively low risks for participation, providing a stable basis for future competition, and rendering the future of Northern Ireland as part of the United Kingdom potentially uncertain. Moderation was a gradual and path-dependent process of increasing returns whereby contact with the stable institutions imposed constraints against radicalism and incentives towards moderation. Republicanism’s transformation is best understood as moving through a series of phases...

Hikāyāt sha‛b - stories of peoplehood: Nasserism, popular politics and songs in Egypt, 1956-1973

Mossallam, Alia
Fonte: London School of Economics and Political Science Thesis Publicador: London School of Economics and Political Science Thesis
Tipo: Thesis; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em //2012 Português
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This study explores the popular politics behind the main milestones that shape Nasserist Egypt. The decade leading up to the 1952 revolution was one characterized with a heightened state of popular mobilisation, much of which the Free Officers’ movement capitalized upon. Thus, in focusing on three of the Revolution’s main milestones; the resistance to the tripartite aggression on Port Said (1956), the building of the Aswan High Dam (1960-­1971), and the popular warfare against Israel in Suez (1967-­1973), I shed light on the popular struggles behind the events. I argue that to the members of resistance of Port Said and Suez, and the builders of the High Dam, the revolution became a struggle of their own. Ideas of socialism and Arab nationalism were re-­articulated and appropriated so that they became features of their identities and everyday lives. Through looking at songs, idioms and stories of the experiences of those periods, I explore how people experimented with a new identity under Nasser and how much they were willing to sacrifice for it. These songs and idioms, I treat as an ‘intimate language’. A common language reflecting a shared experience that often only the community who produces the language can understand. I argue that songs capture in moments of political imagination what official historical narratives may not. Furthermore...

What we put in black and white: George Padmore and the practice of anti-imperial politics

James, Leslie Elaine
Fonte: London School of Economics and Political Science Thesis Publicador: London School of Economics and Political Science Thesis
Tipo: Thesis; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /08/2012 Português
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This thesis offers a new interpretation of the life and importance of George Padmore (1903-1959). Padmore was one of the most well-known ‘black communists’ in the 1930s. He became a major nexus for anti-colonial resistance in London between 1935- 1957 and one of the foremost political thinkers behind the pan-African movement. Through an analysis of his writing and his networks this thesis argues that Padmore engaged in a permanent state of political activity, guided by a practice of ‘pragmatic anti-imperialism.’ By tracing his journalism in West African and West Indian colonies, it shows that Padmore’s influence was far more extensive than previously imagined. This study begins from the hypothesis that the pragmatism of Padmore’s politics can only be demonstrated by examining his whole life, and thus takes the form of a biography. Taking Padmore’s pragmatism as a starting point, the forms in which he was understood and labeled by others are fundamental to this study since they demonstrate the extent to which Padmore was willing to compromise and ‘play the game’ of imperial politics, and they show the boundaries of the field in which he operated. Overall, this thesis aims to contribute to a deeper understanding of race and non-violent resistance in anti-imperial politics in the first half of the twentieth century by focusing upon the role of a mobile...