Página 1 dos resultados de 91 itens digitais encontrados em 0.036 segundos

Does trade explain Europe’s rise? Geography, market size and economic development

Studer, Roman
Fonte: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /11/2009 Português
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513.23676%
This paper tests whether the so-called ‘reach of the market’ helps to explain ‘why Europe’ and ‘why north-western Europe’. By looking at grain markets from the late seventeenth to the early twentieth century, this study concludes that the process of commodity market integration pre-dated the take-off in the late eighteenth or early nineteenth century, so it was neither a concomitant nor an effect of the Industrial Revolution, but indeed a plausible determinant for the rise of Europe. When looking at differences within Europe, it finds that in terms of economic integration, there were two distinct zones in early modern Europe – landlocked and lowland Europe. In the latter, markets clearly extended to much bigger geographical areas before the arrival of steam transportation and the creation of extensive road networks, which can be explained by physical geography that had endowed lowland Europe with easier and cheaper transportation.

Book review: The Holocaust and genocides in Europe

Varin, Caroline
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 31/05/2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
611.6982%
"The Holocaust and Genocides in Europe." Benjamin Lieberman. Bloomsbury Academic. April 2013. --- Focusing on the major cases of genocide in twentieth-century Europe, including the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust and genocide in the former Yugoslavia, as well as mass killing in the Soviet Union, this book outlines the internal and external roots of genocide. Using the voices of the human actors in genocide, often ignored or forgotten, this volume aims to provide arresting new insights into the discussion of genocide in other continents and historical periods. Caroline Varin would have liked to see more content suitable for advanced readers and students, but would recommend this book to readers looking for a quick overview of the subject of genocides in Europe.

Book review: Democratic institutions and authoritarian rule in South East Europe

Corbett, Anne
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 06/09/2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
620.45016%
"Democratic Institutions and Authoritarian Rule in South East Europe." Danijela Dolenec. ECPR Press. May 2013. --- Two decades on from the strife that plagued the former Yugoslavia, many see the widening of EU membership into Southeast Europe as signifying the rise of stable and functioning democracy in the region. In Democratic Institutions and Authoritarian Rule in South East Europe, Danijela Dolenec takes issue with this view, making comparisons with the far more democratically stable countries of Central Europe. Anne Corbett commends the book’s in-depth examination of the political structural legacies which have led to ‘locked in’ authoritarianism in much of Southeast Europe.

Book Review: The 50 days that changed Europe

Kaiser, Wolfram
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 29/07/2012 Português
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This book covers a selection of key dates in the history of Europe, covering some key failures, crises and blunders, but also the extraordinary achievements such as the abolition of border posts, the reunification of Germany and the introduction of the Euro. Wolfram Kaiser finds that Hanneke Siebelink‘s book makes for a light read for the casual reader with interests in the EU and its history.

Book review: European media: structures, politics and identity

Tambini, Damian
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 24/06/2012 Português
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514.25523%
Examining interactions between global, regional and national media processes, European Media emphasises the transformation of political communication in Europe and the alleged emergence of a European public sphere and identity. Damian Tambini finds it offers an excellent overview and reference on some of the big shifts that characterise the evolving media scene in Europe.

Book review: the 50 days that changed Europe

Kaiser, Wolfram
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 25/07/2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
609.56797%
This book covers a selection of key dates in the history of Europe, covering some key failures, crises and blunders, but also the extraordinary achievements such as the abolition of border posts, the reunification of Germany and the introduction of the Euro. Wolfram Kaiser finds that Hanneke Siebelink‘s book makes for a light read for the casual reader with interests in the EU and its history. The 50 Days That Changed Europe. Hanneke Siebelink. Luster Publishing. July 2011.

The Shelley-Byron circle and the idea of Europe

Stock, Paul
Fonte: Palgrave Macmillan Publicador: Palgrave Macmillan
Tipo: Book; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 14/05/2010 Português
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606.4233%
This book investigates how Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, and their circle understood the idea of Europe. What geographical, cultural, and ideological concepts do they associate with the term? What does this tell us about politics and identity in early nineteenth-century Britain? In addressing these questions, Paul Stock challenges prevailing nationalist interpretations of Romanticism, but without falling prey to imprecise alternative notions of cosmopolitanism or "world citizenship." Instead, his work accounts for both the transnational and the local in Romantic writing, reassessing the period in terms of more complex, multi-layered identity politics.

The Shelleys and the Idea of Europe

Stock, Paul
Fonte: Routledge Publicador: Routledge
Tipo: Article; PeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /10/2008 Português
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615.31043%
This article explores how the Shelleys and their circle configure ideas of “Europe” between January 1817 and March 1818. I begin with Frankenstein, discussing how Mary Shelley associates Frankenstein's experiment with the particularly “European” problem of over-reaching - a drive for success leading to conflict or failure. I then turn to Laon and Cythna, a poem which labels itself as “revolution writing” and contemplates how the French revolution changed “Europe.” Here, Percy Shelley constructs an idea of “Europe” upon his interests in radical politics and the possibility of utopian social progress. Laon's setting, Constantinople, is a border-zone between Europe and Asia; it is simultaneously a European city in the throes of revolution and an Oriental tyranny. The Shelleys evoke “America” in a similar manner, treating it as a non-European “other” and as a more ideal version of “Europe” uncorrupted by post-revolutionary disappointments. Lastly, based on a remark in a letter to Percy Shelley about “European marriage,” I examine the connection between “Europeanness” and sexual mores. If, for Shelley, debates about “Europe” occur within specific parameters relating to revolution and radical change...

"Almost a separate race": racial thought and the idea of Europe in British encyclopaedias and histories, 1771-1830

Stock, Paul
Fonte: Cambridge University Press Publicador: Cambridge University Press
Tipo: Article; PeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /04/2011 Português
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618.3765%
This article explores the association between racial thought and the idea of Europe in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain. It begins by noting the complexities surrounding the word "race" in this period, before considering whether-and on what grounds-contemporary race thinkers identify a "European race" or "races". This reveals important ambiguities and correlations between anatomical, genealogical and cultural understandings of human difference. The essay then discusses how some of these ideas find expression in British encyclopedias, histories and geographical books. In this way, it shows how racial ideas are disseminated, not just in dedicated volumes on anatomy and biological classification, but also in general works which purport to summarize and transmit contemporary received knowledge. The article draws upon entries on "Europe" in every British encyclopedia completed between 1771 and 1830, as well as named source texts for those articles, tracing how the word "Europe" was used and what racial connotations it carried. Some entries imply that "European" is either a separate race entirely, or a subcategory of a single human race. Others, however, reject the idea of a distinctive European people to identify competing racial groups in Europe. These complexities reveal increasing interest in the delineation of European identities...

Wu-Wei in Europe. A study of Eurasian economic thought

Gerlach, Christian
Fonte: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /03/2005 Português
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611.6982%
This present paper focuses on the diffusion of wu-wei (an ancient Chinese concept of political economy) throughout Europe, between 1648 and 1848. It argues that at the core of this diffusion process were three major developments; firstly the importation and active transmission of wu-wei by the Low Countries, during the seventeenth century. It is revealed that the details of Chinese expertise entered Europe via the textual diffusion of Jesuit texts and the visual diffusion of million of so-called minben-images, during the ceramic boom of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Thus, the hypothesis is advanced that the diffusion of wu-wei, co-evolved with the inner-European laissez-faire principle, the Libaniusian model. In the second part it is shown that the intellectual foundation of Europe’s first economic school, Physiocracy, is a direct replica of the imported Chinese economic, agrarian craftsmanship of wu-wei; subsequently it is denied that the indigenous European Libaniusian ideology can be considered the intellectual master-model of Physiocracy and his founder Quesnay. Thirdly, it is argued that Switzerland can be identified as the first European paradigm state of wu-wei. The crystallization process of wu-wei inside Europe ultimately ended with the economic-political reorganization of the new Eidgenossenschaft in 1848...

Transferring technical knowledge and innovating in Europe, c.1200-c.1800

Epstein, Stephan R.
Fonte: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /05/2005 Português
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616.83797%
The role of technology in the transition from premodern to modern economies in late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe is among the major questions in economic history, but it is still poorly understood. A plausible explanation of premodern European technological development must account for why Europe industrialised in advance of the great Asian civilisations, despite still being a comparative backwater in the twelfth century. What appears to set Western Europe apart is not that technological progress occurred at a faster rate than elsewhere, but that progress was more persistent and uninterrupted. The technical knowledge of premodern craftsmen and engineers was largely experience-based; thus, virtually all premodern technical knowledge was, and had to be, transferred in the flesh. However, the implications for premodern economic history of the basic cognitive limitations to how technical knowledge can be expressed, processed, and transmitted have yet to be examined in any detail. This paper asks how premodern European societies were able to generate incremental technical innovation under three headings: How was premodern technical knowledge stored to avoid loss? How were tacit, visual, verbal, and written means of transmission used heuristically? How was established and new knowledge transmitted?

The Jesuits as knowledge brokers between Europe and China (1582-1773): shaping European views of the Middle Kingdom

Millar, Ashley E.
Fonte: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /09/2007 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
613.23676%
Europe in the sixteenth and most of the seventeenth century was engulfed in a wave of Sinophilia. However, by the eighteenth century a dramatic shift in the popular view of China in Europe occurred and Sinophobic writings began to dominate. The primary scholarly argument about the causes behind this shift in perceptions maintains the transformation stemmed predominantly from changes in European history, particularly, economic growth and political consolidation. This paper asks how the motives, the roles and the consequences of the Jesuits as agents of information regarding China affected the European perception of the Middle Kingdom and contributed to the evolution of Orientalism. It examines the evolution of the Jesuit mission in China, the role of personal motivation and problems surrounding conceptual and practical barriers to the construction and transmission of information. It finds that economic progress and political consolidation in Europe did result in a changing of perspectives on the nature of the Empire of China. However, this shift did not occur solely due to endogenous changes in Europe, but was also a result of the creation of the one-dimensional image of China by the Jesuits according to their personal motivations and unique context.

The evolution of entertainment consumption and the emergence of cinema, 1890-1940

Bakker, Gerben
Fonte: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /06/2007 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
514.7077%
This paper investigates the role of consumption in the emergence of the motion picture industry in Britain France and the US. A time-lag of at least twelve years between the invention of cinema and the film industry’s take-off suggests that the latter was not mainly technology-driven. In all three countries, demand for spectator entertainment grew at a phenomenal rate, far more still in quantity than in expenditure terms. In 1890 ‘amusements and vacation’ was a luxury service in all three countries. Later, US consumers consumed consistently more cinema than live, compared to Europe. More disaggregated data for the 1930s reveal that in Europe, cinema was an inferior good, in the US it was a luxury, and that in Europe, live entertainment was just above a normal good, while in the US it was a strong luxury. Comparative analysis of consumption differences suggests that one-thirds of the US/UK difference and nearly all of the UK/France difference can be explained by differences in relative price (‘technology’), and all of the US/France difference by differences in preferences (‘taste’). These findings suggest a strong UK comparative advantage in live entertainment production. Using informal comparative growth analysis, the paper finds that cinema consumption was part of a large boom in expenditure on a variety of leisure goods and services; over time...

Foundations in Europe: a comparative perspective

Anheier, Helmut K.
Fonte: Centre for Civil Society, London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: Centre for Civil Society, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /08/2001 Português
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606.4233%
Europe has a rich tapestry of foundations. The countries of this continent vary by the type, size, activities, role, development and recent growth of foundations. This paper first shows and then analyses these differences, and suggests common themes and policy implications.

Citizenship in pre-modern Eurasia: a comparison between China, the Near East and Europe

Prak, Maarten
Fonte: London School of Economics and Political Science Research Publicador: London School of Economics and Political Science Research
Tipo: Conference or Workshop Item; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /11/2011 Português
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606.4233%
‘Good’ institutions are now often portrayed as a precondition for economic development and growth. This paper revisits an old thesis, first articulated by Max Weber, that citizenship explains why Europe managed to modernise and Asian societies did not. Like Weber, the paper focuses on urban citizenship, but uses a broader definition than he did. The paper finds that although Asian towns did not have legal citizenship, they displayed many more characteristics of citizenship-as-practice than Weber and his followers allowed for. It also finds that European towns often were less autonomous than Weber assumed. Economic development and growth in the pre-modern era were not so much determined by citizenship per se, but by the way towns and urban interests could be articulated at state level.

Book Review: Euroscepticism within the EU institutions: diverging views of europe

Brown, Stuart A.; Brack, Nathalie; Costa, Olivier
Fonte: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science Publicador: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /06/2012 Português
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619.5302%
Since its origins, there have been competing views concerning the nature, scope and objectives of the process of integration and of the European Union. Attitudes towards Europe and European integration, both among political elites and citizens, have been much studied over the last 15 years. But there is no comprehensive analysis of these competing views of Europe at the supranational level. Stuart A. Brown reviews Nathalie Brack and Olivier Costa’s edited collection on the divergence in views about the European Union, which lends insight into its consequences for the functioning of the EU and its institutions.

Book review: Fleeting cities: imperial expositions in fin-de-siècle Europe by Alexander Geppert

Franklin, Sophie
Fonte: London School of Economics and Political Science Publicador: London School of Economics and Political Science
Tipo: Website; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 07/03/2014 Português
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"Fleeting Cities: Imperial Expositions in Fin-de-Siècle Europe." Alexander C. T. Geppert. Palgrave Macmillan. October 2013. --- In this book, Alexander C. T. Geppert considers how modernity was created and displayed at imperial expositions held in fin-de-siècle London, Paris and Berlin. Focusing on five such expositions – the Berliner Gewerbeausstellung (1896), the fifth Parisian Exposition Universelle (1900), the Franco-British Exhibition in London (1908), the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley (1924/25), and the Exposition Coloniale Internationale in Paris (1931) – this book focuses on their specific aims and aspirations, evolving forms and execution, and the public debates they engendered. Sophie Franklin finds this book an ambitious and engaging study that also provides a fresh close reading of the contemporary impact and urban legacy of the complex network of exhibitions.

Public service broadcasting in Slovenia and Macedonia: creating stars

Broughton Micova, Sally
Fonte: Cambridge Scholars Publishing Publicador: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Tipo: Book Section; PeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em 01/02/2014 Português
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511.563%
Small nations are growing in prominence. In 1950, there were 22 sovereign European states with a population below 18 million. Today there are 36 – not to mention many more stateless nations. What are the particular characteristics of the media in small nations? What challenges do broadcasters and other media institutions in these countries face, how can these be overcome, and are there advantages to operating in a small national context? How are small nations represented on screen, and how do audiences in small nations engage with the media? Bringing together perspectives from across Europe, including case-studies on Catalonia, the Basque Country, Wales, Scotland, Iceland, Portugal, Slovenia and Macedonia, this collection answers these questions. At the same time, it provides readers with insights into broader issues of media policy, representation, national identity, transnationalism, audience reception and media research methods. With European media institutions and practitioners coming to terms with the changes brought about by digitisation and globalisation against a backdrop of financial uncertainty, this collection offers a timely contribution to debates about the media in Europe. Contributors include: Steve Blandford, John Newbigin...

Boosting innovation and productivity growth in Europe: the hope and the realities of the EU's "Lisbon agenda"

Fonte: The London School of Economics and Political Science, Center of Economic Performance Publicador: The London School of Economics and Political Science, Center of Economic Performance
Tipo: Monograph; PeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /10/2006 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
618.3765%
The United States has significantly higher productivity than the European average. US GDP per hour is over 15% higher than Europe’s; and US GDP per capita is over 30% higher. • From the end of the Second World War until the mid-1990s, Europe was catching up with US levels of productivity. But since then, US productivity growth has been faster than in Europe. • In 2000, the European Union (EU) launched the ‘Lisbon agenda’. This had the aim of making Europe ‘the most dynamic and competitive knowledge-based economy in the world, capable of sustainable economic growth, with more and better jobs, greater social cohesion and respect for the environment’. • Stimulating innovation was seen as a major route to reaching this goal. In particular, the EU set the ‘Barcelona target’ of increasing research and development (R&D) to 3% of GDP by 2010. The Lisbon agenda has not realised its objectives. A major reason for this is the failure of EU members to liberalise their product and labour markets. • Although the numerical target for R&D makes little economic sense, the emphasis on innovation as a route to growth is sensible. • The cost of patenting in Europe is about five times the cost of patenting in the United States. The suggested introduction of a ‘Community patent’ would lower this cost and make it easier for European firms to patent their innovations. • The ‘brain drain’ from the EU to the United States – because of better research opportunities and higher wages – is still a significant phenomenon. The Lisbon agenda’s aim of reversing this trend has not materialised.

Climate change policy and business in Europe. evidence from interviewing managers

Anderson, Barry; Leib, Jörg; Martin, Ralf; McGuigan, Marty; Muuls, Mirabelle; Wagner, Ulrich J.; de Preux, Laure B.
Fonte: The London School of Economics and Political Science, Center of Economic Performance Publicador: The London School of Economics and Political Science, Center of Economic Performance
Tipo: Monograph; NonPeerReviewed Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em /03/2011 Português
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606.4233%
This report presents new evidence relating to the effects of climate policy in Europe, particularly the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS). The evidence is based on new data from almost 800 phone interviews we conducted with managers in manufacturing plants in six European countries: Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Poland and the UK. The interview design follows an innovative method that has recently emerged in the study of management practices and that mitigates well-known biases found in more conventional survey designs such as paper-based or web-based questionnaires. This report describes the interview design in detail and summarises the responses. For further analysis, we link the interview data with company data from a range of secondary sources including transaction data from the official EU ETS registry and performance data from both commercial and government sources. We use the combined data to analyse three aspects of the EU ETS in depth, namely (i) the behaviour of firms in the EU ETS, (ii) the vulnerability of firms in terms of negative impacts on employment and carbon leakage, along with an assessment of how well the proposed EU legislation to protect vulnerable firms does at identifying them, and (iii) alternative criteria for the allocation of free emission permits during the next phase of the EU ETS.