Página 1 dos resultados de 649 itens digitais encontrados em 0.020 segundos

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY IN BIODIVERSITY SCIENCE, CONSERVATION, AND POLICY: A CALL TO ACTION

HENDRY, Andrew P.; LOHMANN, Lucia G.; CONTI, Elena; CRACRAFT, Joel; CRANDALL, Keith A.; FAITH, Daniel P.; HAEUSER, Christoph; JOLY, Carlos A.; KOGURE, Kazuhiro; LARIGAUDERIE, Anne; MAGALLON, Susana; MORITZ, Craig; TILLIER, Simon; ZARDOYA, Rafael; PRIEUR-R
Fonte: WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC Publicador: WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.54773%
Evolutionary biologists have long endeavored to document how many species exist on Earth, to understand the processes by which biodiversity waxes and wanes, to document and interpret spatial patterns of biodiversity, and to infer evolutionary relationships. Despite the great potential of this knowledge to improve biodiversity science, conservation, and policy, evolutionary biologists have generally devoted limited attention to these broader implications. Likewise, many workers in biodiversity science have underappreciated the fundamental relevance of evolutionary biology. The aim of this article is to summarize and illustrate some ways in which evolutionary biology is directly relevant We do so in the context of four broad areas: (1) discovering and documenting biodiversity, (2) understanding the causes of diversification, (3) evaluating evolutionary responses to human disturbances, and (4) implications for ecological communities, ecosystems, and humans We also introduce bioGENESIS, a new project within DIVERSITAS launched to explore the potential practical contributions of evolutionary biology In addition to fostering the integration of evolutionary thinking into biodiversity science, bioGENESIS provides practical recommendations to policy makers for incorporating evolutionary perspectives into biodiversity agendas and conservation. We solicit your involvement in developing innovative ways of using evolutionary biology to better comprehend and stem the loss of biodiversity.; Yale University; Yale University; Kyushu University; Kyushu University; EDIT; EDIT; Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP); FAPESP; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP); Universidade de São Paulo (USP); CNPq; Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq); DIVERSITAS; DIVERSITAS

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology of Arabidopsis

Pigliucci, Massimo
Fonte: American Society of Plant Biologists Publicador: American Society of Plant Biologists
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 04/04/2002 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.306455%
Arabidopsis thaliana is now widely used as a model system in molecular and developmental biology, as well as in physiology and cell biology. However, ecologists and evolutionary biologists have turned their attention to the mouse ear cress only much more recently and almost reluctantly. The reason for this is the perception that A. thaliana is not particularly interesting ecologically and that it represents an oddity from an evolutionary standpoint. While there is some truth in both these attitudes, similar criticisms apply to other model systems such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which has been extensively studied from an organismal perspective. Furthermore, the shortcomings of A. thaliana in terms of its restricted ecological niche are counterbalanced by the wealth of information on the molecular and developmental biology of this species, which makes possible to address evolutionary questions that can rarely be pursued in other species. This chapter reviews the history of the use of A. thaliana in organismal biology and discusses some of the recent work and future perspectives of research on a variety of field including life history evolution, phenotypic plasticity, natural selection and quantitative genetics. I suggest that the future of both molecular and especially organismal biology lies into expanding our knowledge from limited and idiosyncratic model systems to their phylogenetic neighborhood...

Do citations and impact factors relate to the real numbers in publications? A case study of citation rates, impact, and effect sizes in ecology and evolutionary biology

Lortie, Christopher J.; Aarssen, Lonnie W.; Budden, Amber E.; Leimu, Roosa
Fonte: Springer Netherlands Publicador: Springer Netherlands
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
88.27762%
Metrics of success or impact in academia may do more harm than good. To explore the value of citations, the reported efficacy of treatments in ecology and evolution from close to 1,500 publications was examined. If citation behavior is rationale, i.e. studies that successfully applied a treatment and detected greater biological effects are cited more frequently, then we predict that larger effect sizes increases study relative citation rates. This prediction was not supported. Citations are likely thus a poor proxy for the quantitative merit of a given treatment in ecology and evolutionary biology—unlike evidence-based medicine wherein the success of a drug or treatment on human health is one of the critical attributes. Impact factor of the journal is a broader metric, as one would expect, but it also unrelated to the mean effect sizes for the respective populations of publications. The interpretation by the authors of the treatment effects within each study differed depending on whether the hypothesis was supported or rejected. Significantly larger effect sizes were associated with rejection of a hypothesis. This suggests that only the most rigorous studies reporting negative results are published or that authors set a higher burden of proof in rejecting a hypothesis. The former is likely true to a major extent since only 29 % of the studies rejected the hypotheses tested. These findings indicate that the use of citations to identify important papers in this specific discipline—at least in terms of designing a new experiment or contrasting treatments—is of limited value.

An open future for ecological and evolutionary data?

Kenall, Amye; Harold, Simon; Foote, Christopher
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 02/04/2014 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.358643%
As part of BioMed Central’s open science mission, we are pleased to announce that two of our journals have integrated with the open data repository Dryad. Authors submitting their research to either BMC Ecology or BMC Evolutionary Biology will now have the opportunity to deposit their data directly into the Dryad archive and will receive a permanent, citable link to their dataset. Although this does not affect any of our current data deposition policies at these journals, we hope to encourage a more widespread adoption of open data sharing in the fields of ecology and evolutionary biology by facilitating this process for our authors. We also take this opportunity to discuss some of the wider issues that may concern researchers when making their data openly available. Although we offer a number of positive examples from different fields of biology, we also recognise that reticence to data sharing still exists, and that change must be driven from within research communities in order to create future science that is fit for purpose in the digital age.

An open future for ecological and evolutionary data?

Kenall, Amye; Harold, Simon; Foote, Christopher
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 02/04/2014 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.358643%
As part of BioMed Central’s open science mission, we are pleased to announce that two of our journals have integrated with the open data repository Dryad. Authors submitting their research to either BMC Ecology or BMC Evolutionary Biology will now have the opportunity to deposit their data directly into the Dryad archive and will receive a permanent, citable link to their dataset. Although this does not affect any of our current data deposition policies at these journals, we hope to encourage a more widespread adoption of open data sharing in the fields of ecology and evolutionary biology by facilitating this process for our authors. We also take this opportunity to discuss some of the wider issues that may concern researchers when making their data openly available. Although we offer a number of positive examples from different fields of biology, we also recognise that reticence to data sharing still exists, and that change must be driven from within research communities in order to create future science that is fit for purpose in the digital age.

Using observation-level random effects to model overdispersion in count data in ecology and evolution

Harrison, Xavier A.
Fonte: PeerJ Inc. Publicador: PeerJ Inc.
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 09/10/2014 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
77.79075%
Overdispersion is common in models of count data in ecology and evolutionary biology, and can occur due to missing covariates, non-independent (aggregated) data, or an excess frequency of zeroes (zero-inflation). Accounting for overdispersion in such models is vital, as failing to do so can lead to biased parameter estimates, and false conclusions regarding hypotheses of interest. Observation-level random effects (OLRE), where each data point receives a unique level of a random effect that models the extra-Poisson variation present in the data, are commonly employed to cope with overdispersion in count data. However studies investigating the efficacy of observation-level random effects as a means to deal with overdispersion are scarce. Here I use simulations to show that in cases where overdispersion is caused by random extra-Poisson noise, or aggregation in the count data, observation-level random effects yield more accurate parameter estimates compared to when overdispersion is simply ignored. Conversely, OLRE fail to reduce bias in zero-inflated data, and in some cases increase bias at high levels of overdispersion. There was a positive relationship between the magnitude of overdispersion and the degree of bias in parameter estimates. Critically...

Within and between Whorls: Comparative Transcriptional Profiling of Aquilegia and Arabidopsis

Voelckel, Claudia; Borevitz, Justin O.; Hodges, Scott A.; Baxter, Ivan; Kramer, Elena M.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.814424%
Background: The genus Aquilegia is an emerging model system in plant evolutionary biology predominantly because of its wide variation in floral traits and associated floral ecology. The anatomy of the Aquilegia flower is also very distinct. There are two whorls of petaloid organs, the outer whorl of sepals and the second whorl of petals that form nectar spurs, as well as a recently evolved fifth whorl of staminodia inserted between stamens and carpels. Methodology/Principal Findings: We designed an oligonucleotide microarray based on EST sequences from a mixed tissue, normalized cDNA library of an A. formosa x A. pubescens F2 population representing 17,246 unigenes. We then used this array to analyze floral gene expression in late pre-anthesis stage floral organs from a natural A. formosa population. In particular, we tested for gene expression patterns specific to each floral whorl and to combinations of whorls that correspond to traditional and modified ABC model groupings. Similar analyses were performed on gene expression data of Arabidopsis thaliana whorls previously obtained using the Ath1 gene chips (data available through The Arabidopsis Information Resource). Conclusions/Significance: Our comparative gene expression analyses suggest that 1) petaloid sepals and petals of A. formosa share gene expression patterns more than either have organ-specific patterns...

9-Genes Reinforce the Phylogeny of Holometabola and Yield Alternate Views on the Phylogenetic Placement of Strepsiptera

McKenna, Duane D; Farrell, Brian Dorsey
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.37266%
Background: The extraordinary morphology, reproductive and developmental biology, and behavioral ecology of twisted wing parasites (order Strepsiptera) have puzzled biologists for centuries. Even today, the phylogenetic position of these enigmatic “insects from outer space” [1] remains uncertain and contentious. Recent authors have argued for the placement of Strepsiptera within or as a close relative of beetles (order Coleoptera), as sister group of flies (order Diptera), or even outside of Holometabola.Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we combine data from several recent studies with new data (for a total of 9 nuclear genes and ∼13 kb of aligned data for 34 taxa), to help clarify the phylogenetic placement of Strepsiptera. Our results unequivocally support the monophyly of Neuropteroidea ( = Neuropterida + Coleoptera) + Strepsiptera, but recover Strepsiptera either derived from within polyphagan beetles (order Coleoptera), or in a position sister to Neuropterida. All other supra-ordinal- and ordinal-level relationships recovered with strong nodal support were consistent with most other recent studies. Conclusions/Significance: These results, coupled with the recent proposed placement of Strepsiptera sister to Coleoptera...

Expression and Putative Function of Innate Immunity Genes under In Situ Conditions in the Symbiotic Hydrothermal Vent Tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae

Nyholm, Spencer V.; Song, Pengfei; Dang, Jeanne; Bunce, Corey; Girguis, Peter R.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.77298%
The relationships between hydrothermal vent tubeworms and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria have served as model associations for understanding chemoautotrophy and endosymbiosis. Numerous studies have focused on the physiological and biochemical adaptations that enable these symbioses to sustain some of the highest recorded carbon fixation rates ever measured. However, far fewer studies have explored the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of host and symbiont interactions, specifically those mediated by the innate immune system of the host. To that end, we conducted a series of studies where we maintained the tubeworm, Ridgeia piscesae, in high-pressure aquaria and examined global and quantitative changes in gene expression via high-throughput transcriptomics and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). We analyzed over 32,000 full-length expressed sequence tags as well as 26 Mb of transcript sequences from the trophosome (the organ that houses the endosymbiotic bacteria) and the plume (the gas exchange organ in contact with the free-living microbial community). R. piscesae maintained under conditions that promote chemoautotrophy expressed a number of putative cell signaling and innate immunity genes, including pattern recognition receptors (PRRs)...

A Veritable Menagerie of Heritable Bacteria from Ants, Butterflies, and Beyond: Broad Molecular Surveys and a Systematic Review

Russell, Jacob A.; Funaro, Colin F.; Giraldo, Ysabel M.; Goldman-Huertas, Benjamin; Suh, David; Kronauer, Daniel J. C.; Moreau, Corrie S.; Pierce, Naomi Ellen
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.40792%
Maternally transmitted bacteria have been important players in the evolution of insects and other arthropods, affecting their nutrition, defense, development, and reproduction. Wolbachia are the best studied among these and typically the most prevalent. While several other bacteria have independently evolved a heritable lifestyle, less is known about their host ranges. Moreover, most groups of insects have not had their heritable microflora systematically surveyed across a broad range of their taxonomic diversity. To help remedy these shortcomings we used diagnostic PCR to screen for five groups of heritable symbionts—Arsenophonus spp., Cardinium hertigii, Hamiltonella defensa, Spiroplasma spp., and Wolbachia spp.—across the ants and lepidopterans (focusing, in the latter case, on two butterfly families—the Lycaenidae and Nymphalidae). We did not detect Cardinium or Hamiltonella in any host. Wolbachia were the most widespread, while Spiroplasma (ants and lepidopterans) and Arsenophonus (ants only) were present at low levels. Co-infections with different Wolbachia strains appeared especially common in ants and less so in lepidopterans. While no additional facultative heritable symbionts were found among ants using universal bacterial primers...

A New Species of Skin-Feeding Caecilian and the First Report of Reproductive Mode in Microcaecilia (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Siphonopidae)

Wilkinson, Mark; Sherratt, Emma; Starace, Fausto; Gower, David J.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.364824%
A new species of siphonopid caecilian, Microcaecilia dermatophaga sp. nov., is described based on nine specimens from French Guiana. The new species is the first new caecilian to be described from French Guiana for more than 150 years. It differs from all other Microcaecilia in having fewer secondary annular grooves and/or in lacking a transverse groove on the dorsum of the first collar. Observations of oviparity and of extended parental care in M. dermatophaga are the first reproductive mode data for any species of the genus. Microcaecilia dermatophaga is the third species, and represents the third genus, for which there has been direct observation of young animals feeding on the skin of their attending mother. The species is named for this maternal dermatophagy, which is hypothesised to be characteristic of the Siphonopidae.; Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

SYNTOPIC COEXISTENCE AND HABITAT USAGE IN TWO MORPHOLOGICALLY SIMILAR PLETHODON SPECIES

Murphy, Nathan L.
Fonte: [Bloomington, Ind.] : Indiana University Publicador: [Bloomington, Ind.] : Indiana University
Tipo: Doctoral Dissertation
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
78.015493%
Thesis (PhD) - Indiana University, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 2006; Numerous studies have shown terrestrial salamanders of similar size compete strongly for cover objects on the forest floor. The cover objects provide a refuge that allows the owner more foraging opportunities throughout the year. Usually the competition between species is asymmetric and results in the exclusion of one of the species from large areas. In Hoosier National Forest, Plethodon cinereus and P. dorsalis coexist broadly and appear to share the same microhabitats. A number of factors might explain this unique case of coexistence. P. cinereus is more common in drier habitats and becomes more predominant as spring becomes warmer and drier compared to P. dorsalis. P. dorsalis is more common in the moister habitats, and predominates early in the spring. P. cinereus also looses water more slowly compared to P. dorsalis. Although P. cinereus is larger and shows higher levels of aggressive behaviors associated with cover object defense, P. dorsalis is better able to hold ownership of cover objects in the lab. The coexistence may be the result of the greater physiological tolerance of P. cinereus to drier conditions, which allow it to feed in habitats and at times unavailable to P. dorsalis. As conditions on the forest floor get warmer and drier as spring progresses...

Intercontinental Community Convergence of Ecology and Morphology in Desert Lizards

Harmon, Luke J.; Melville, Jane; Losos, Jonathan
Fonte: The Royal Society of London Publicador: The Royal Society of London
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.4002%
Evolutionary ecologists have long debated the extent to which communities in similar environments but different geographic regions exhibit convergence. On the one hand, if species' adaptations and community structure are determined by environmental features, convergence would be expected. However, if historical contingencies have long-lasting effects convergence would be unlikely. Most studies to date have emphasized the differences between communities in similar environments and little quantitative evidence for convergence exists. The application of comparative phylogenetic methods to ecological studies provides an opportunity to further investigate hypotheses of convergence. We compared the evolutionary patterns of structural ecology and morphology of 42 species of iguanian lizards from deserts of Australia and North America. Using a comparative approach, we found that evolutionary convergence of ecology and morphology occurs both in overall, community-wide patterns and in terms of pairs of highly similar intercontinental pairs of species. This result indicates that in these desert lizards, deterministic adaptive evolution shapes community patterns and overrides the historical contingencies unique to particular lineages.; Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

Quantitative Genetics Meets Integral Projection Models: Unification of Widely Used Methods from Ecology and Evolution

Coulson, Tim; Plard, Floriane; Schindler, Susanne; Ozgul, Arpat; Gaillard, Jean-Michel
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 04/09/2015 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
78.51715%
1) Micro-evolutionary predictions are complicated by ecological feedbacks like density dependence, while ecological predictions can be complicated by evolutionary change. A widely used approach in micro-evolution, quantitative genetics, struggles to incorporate ecological processes into predictive models, while structured population modelling, a tool widely used in ecology, rarely incorporates evolution explicitly. 2) In this paper we develop a flexible, general framework that links quantitative genetics and structured population models. We use the quantitative genetic approach to write down the phenotype as an additive map. We then construct integral projection models for each component of the phenotype. The dynamics of the distribution of the phenotype are generated by combining distributions of each of its components. Population projection models can be formulated on per generation or on shorter time steps. 3) We introduce the framework before developing example models with parameters chosen to exhibit specific dynamics. These models reveal (i) how evolution of a phenotype can cause populations to move from one dynamical regime to another (e.g. from stationarity to cycles), (ii) how additive genetic variances and covariances (the G matrix) are expected to evolve over multiple generations...

The Rise of Network Ecology: Maps of the topic diversity and scientific collaboration

Borrett, Stuart R.; Moody, James; Edelmann, Achim
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 07/11/2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.46938%
Network ecologists investigate the structure, function, and evolution of ecological systems using network models and analyses. For example, network techniques have been used to study community interactions (i.e., food-webs, mutualisms), gene flow across landscapes, and the sociality of individuals in populations. The work presented here uses a bibliographic and network approach to (1) document the rise of Network Ecology, (2) identify the diversity of topics addressed in the field, and (3) map the structure of scientific collaboration among contributing scientists. Our aim is to provide a broad overview of this emergent field that highlights its diversity and to provide a foundation for future advances. To do this, we searched the ISI Web of Science database for ecology publications between 1900 and 2012 using the search terms for research areas of Environmental Sciences & Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the topic tag ecology. From these records we identified the Network Ecology publications using the topic terms network, graph theory, and web while controlling for the usage of misleading phrases. The resulting corpus entailed 29,513 publications between 1936 and 2012. We document the rapid rise in Network Ecology publications per year reaching a magnitude of over 5% of the ecological publications in 2012. Drawing topical information from the publication record content (titles...

Species richness, interaction networks, and diversification in bird communities a synthetic ecological and evolutionary perspective/

Carnicer i Cols, Jofre
Fonte: Bellaterra: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Publicador: Bellaterra: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona,
Tipo: Tesis i dissertacions electròniques; info:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesis Formato: application/pdf
Publicado em //2008 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.71047%
Consultable des del TDX; Títol obtingut de la portada digitalitzada; Aquesta tesi examina els mecanismes ecològics i evolutius que mantenen els gradients de riquesa específica en ocells. S'examinen en primer lloc el patrons de diversitat de l'avifauna de Nord Amèrica. (capitol 1). Tot seguit es testen mecanismes a escala regional, tot estudiant el cas de l'avifauna de Catalunya (capitols 2 i 3). Finalment, es testen diferents mecanismes que regulen la diversitat a escala local en una comunitat d'ocells frugívors al Parc nacional de Doñana. El capitol 6 integra tots els anteriors i els relaciona tot fent una revisió bibliogràfica en profunditat.; Species richness gradients have been analyzed during many decades and they have progressively emerged as a central topic in community ecology (Darwin 1859, Wallace 1878, Willis 1922, Dobzhansky 1950, Fisher 1960, Hillebrand 2004, Riclkefs 2004, Mittelbach et al. 2007, among others). Historically, species richness gradients have been analyzed from two main points of view: the ecological and the evolutionary perspective (Ricklefs 2004, 2006b). The ecological perspective assumes that populations are evolutionarily fixed and studies species richness gradients as the result of regional colonization and extinction processes...

Relationships fade with time: a meta-analysis of temporal trends in publication in ecology and evolution

Jennions, Michael; Moller, Anders Pope
Fonte: Royal Society of London Publicador: Royal Society of London
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.294326%
Both significant positive and negative relationships between the magnitude of research findings (their 'effect size') and their year of publication have been reported in a few areas of biology. These trends have been attributed to Kuhnian paradigm shifts, scientific fads and bias in the choice of study systems. Here we test whether or not these isolated cases reflect a more general trend. We examined the relationship using effect sizes extracted from 44 peer-reviewed meta-analyses covering a wide range of topics in ecological and evolutionary biology. On average, there was a small but significant decline in effect size with year of publication. For the original empirical studies there was also a significant decrease in effect size as sample size increased. However, the effect of year of publication remained even after we controlled for sampling effort. Although these results have several possible explanations, it is suggested that a publication bias against non-significant or weaker findings offers the most parsimonious explanation. As in the medical sciences, non-significant results may take longer to publish and studies with both small sample sizes and non-significant results may be less likely to be published.

Development of Incentives for Data Sharing in Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology

Clifford S. Duke
Fonte: Nature Preceedings Publicador: Nature Preceedings
Tipo: Conferência ou Objeto de Conferência
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
68.31234%
Ready access to data is a key concern in both basic research and problem-solving in the biological sciences, as the scale and scope of the questions that researchers ask expand, and as global problems demand data collected from around the world. With a grant from the National Science Foundation, from 2004 through 2009, the Ecological Society of America (ESA) has led a series of five workshops on data sharing, to help the ecology, evolution, and organismal biology communities find common ground on how to make data more readily discoverable and accessible in their own disciplines. The most recent of these focused in the development of incentives for data sharing, both at the individual and organizational level. This presentation will summarize the workshop recommendations, with a focus on preservation, curation, and access to data; access to analytical and visualization tools; and the need to make data archiving simple and routine. The roles of funders and publishers of research are also key and will be highlighted. *Background/Question/Methods* Ready access to data is a key concern in both basic research and problem-solving in the biological sciences, as the scale and scope of the questions that researchers ask expand...

The Dryad Digital Repository: Published evolutionary data as part of the greater data ecosystem

Todd Vision
Fonte: Nature Preceedings Publicador: Nature Preceedings
Tipo: Manuscript
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
88.21977%
Here we describe the motivation and workings of Dryad, a digital repository for data underlying published articles in the biosciences, that grew out of a grassroots effort to support a joint data archiving policy adopted by a consortium of journals in ecology and evolutionary biology.

Community content building for evolutionary biology: Lessons learned from LepTree and Encyclopedia of Life

Cynthia Parr; Dana Campbell; John Park
Fonte: Nature Preceedings Publicador: Nature Preceedings
Tipo: Conferência ou Objeto de Conferência
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
88.3213%
Online resources to aid large-scale ecological and evolutionary biology are beginning to take root, only a decade behind fields such as genomics and molecular biology. One barrier has been a long tradition, in evolutionary biology at least, of work by individuals on the order of a few hundred of species rather than the thousands or hundreds of thousands necessary to understand the general evolutionary or ecological processes that explain species characteristics and distributions. Advances in collaborative and semantic software offer promise – it should be possible to develop high quality online species-level datasets for comparative analyses and even to integrate, via machine reasoning, across highly customized datasets. In this talk we will compare and contrast two approaches to assembling the data.